Susan Abbott-Jamieson, Ph.D.
Senior Project Manager

Julie Bartsch

Virginia Nazarea, Ph.D.

James Acheson, Ph.D.

Lisa Colburn, Ph.D.

Paul Rago, Ph.D.

Ordman Skipper Alley, Jr.

Jennifer Isť
Project Manager
Jim Roberts
Local Project Coordinator

Ted Ames

Michael Kimball, Ph.D.

Jennifer Sepez, Ph.D.

Susan Abbott-Jamieson, Ph.D.

Susan Abbott-Jamieson is Lead Social Scientist at NOAA Fisheries Headquarters, Office of Science and Technology, and Adjunct Professor of Anthropology, University of Maryland. Her research specializations are in psychological anthropology, community studies, and family and household. She has done field research among East African farmer families coping with economic, social, and cultural change, and Appalachian Kentucky coal mining families coping with structural unemployment due to technological changes in mining and natural resource depletion. As Lead Social Scientist, she is guiding the development of the emerging NOAA Fisheries social science program. The program will improve the agency's ability to meet its mission-related social science research requirements. Susan is the Senior Project Manager of the Local Fisheries Knowledge Project.

James Acheson, Ph.D.

James Acheson is Professor of Anthropology and Marine Sciences at the University of Maine. A noted expert in fisheries social science, he has done extensive fieldwork in fishing communities in Maine on the social science aspects of fisheries management. He has written several books including The Lobster Gangs of Maine and Capturing the Commons.

Ordman “Skipper” Alley, Jr.

Ordman Alley, Jr. (nickname Skip) is a local lobsterman and lifelong resident of Beals, Maine. He graduated in the top ten of his class from Jonesport-Beals High School in 1986. During school he was a member of the National Honor Society as well as an athlete who played varsity soccer, baseball, golf, and basketball. Skip went on to earn his bachelor’s degree in Marketing / Management and continued to play basketball at the college level. Currently, he is married with three children and is an active community member. He has been a T-ball coach for three years, a Little League coach for one year, a Boy Scout leader for six years, and a member of the School Board for seven years. Skip owns his own 35-foot lobster boat, the 'Britt and Matt', and a full gang of wire traps. He also owns a lobster pound with his father.

Ted Ames

Ted Ames is a lobster fisherman and former groundfisherman from Stonington, Maine. In winter, he is a researcher of historical fisheries ecology, compiling fishermen's ecological knowledge (FEK) and ground-proofing it with fisheries science. He has published several works in this field, including a recent article in Fisheries, "The Stock Structure of Atlantic Cod in the Gulf of Maine" (Vol. 29, No. 1, 2004). Ted has a Masters in Biochemistry from the University of Maine and is a former teacher. He chairs the Penobscot East Resource Center, is a member of Stonington Fisheries Alliance, Northwest Atlantic Marine Alliance (NAMA), and is presently vice chair of the Deer Isle-Stonington, ME school board. He is also former executive director of the Maine Gillnetters Association and for many years was a reviewer of Saltonstall-Kennedy research proposals, a groundfish adviser to the New England Fisheries Management Council and a past member of various legislative committees involving Maine fisheries.

Julie Bartsch

Julie Bartsch is an education consultant, providing training and technical assistance to a number of educational organizations. She currently works with the Rural School and Community Trust as a Regional Steward in the Northeast. Julie has served in a number of roles in public education: teacher, K-12 administrator, college faculty/administrator, school board member, and consultant. Her career in education has focused on her commitment to forging partnerships between K-12 schools, higher education institutions and community, including creating the National Institute for School/Community Collaboration while a Fellow at Tufts University. Julie holds advanced graduate degrees in management and education form Lesley University and the Harvard School of Education. While at the Harvard School of Education, she worked on the development of a School Leadership Academy and an annual institute on “Innovations in Literacy, Learning and Assessment.” She recently published ”Community Lessons” - a collection of promising curricular practices in community and place-based learning.

Lisa L. Colburn, Ph.D.

Lisa Colburn received her Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Connecticut. Lisa is now a Social Scientist for NOAA Fisheries, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, located in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. She has conducted applied research in coastal communities in New England and Madagascar. Her earlier research included nutritional practices in Nepal. Lisa is currently writing and reviewing social impact assessments for fisheries management plans and conducts basic research on fishing communities in New England. Other research interests include the importance of social networks in household and community adaptation to social change (e.g., implementation of fisheries management regulations).

Jennifer Isé

Jennifer Isé is Project Manager of the Local Fisheries Knowledge Project and currently works in NOAA Fisheries’ Office of Policy as a policy analyst. Before joining NOAA Fisheries, Jennifer worked for the National Estuarine Research Reserve System, part of NOAA’s Ocean Service. She has a master’s degree in marine affairs from the University of Washington. Her thesis work explored motivations of rural landowners to voluntarily adopt conservation-oriented land management practices as well as their attitudes and perceptions about working with government land conservation programs.

Michael Kimball, Ph.D.

Michael Kimball is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Maine-Machias. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin in 1998 His research focuses on prehistoric maritime fishing societies and cultural change. In addition to his archaeological investigations, he is also working on contemporary cultural issues linked to the coastal communities of Washington County, Maine, where he now lives and teaches.

Virginia Nazarea, Ph.D.

Virginia D. Nazarea is a Professor of Anthropology at the University of Georgia and Director of the Ethnoecology/Biodiversity Laboratory. Her research interests are in the areas of local knowledge, agricultural and natural resources decision-making, and cultural and biological diversity. She has done fieldwork in the Philippines, Ecuador, and Southern USA. Her publications include Local Knowledge and Agricultural Decision Making in the Philippines: Class, Gender, and Resistance (1995), Cultural Memory and Biodiversity (1998), and Ethnoecology: Situated Knowledge/Located Lives (ed., 1999). With her students, she has also published a protocol, Yesterday's Ways, Tomorrow's Treasures: Heirloom Plants and Memory Banking (1997 in English, forthcoming in Spanish).

Paul Rago, Ph.D.

Paul Rago is a fisheries research biologist with NOAA Fisheries in Woods Hole, Massachusetts where he leads a group on fishery stock assessment methods. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1986. Before coming to NOAA Fisheries, he was Research Coordinator for the Emergency Striped Bass Study for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Dr. Rago has been actively involved in the design, implementation, and analysis of a number of projects involving the use of fishermen's data in stock assessment. These projects have included studies with the surfclam-ocean quahog, sea scallop, and monkfish fisheries. In 2000, Dr. Rago helped organize and chaired an international symposium on the use of fishermen's information in stock assessment in Brugge, Belgium for the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea. Over the past several years, Rago has been actively involved in a number of training activities for at-sea observers, graduate students, and fishermen.

Jim Roberts

Jim Roberts is the Local Project Coordinator, located in Beals, Maine, for the Local Fisheries Knowledge Pilot Project. He works with the Rural School and Community Trust and is the Curriculum Developer for the Washington County Consortium, in Machias, Maine. Jim is a graduate of the University of Maine at Orono, School of Forest Resources. He was born and raised in Eastport, Maine; the easterly most located city in the U.S. Jim was a classroom teacher for the past 11 years and then went to work for Maine Medical Center's Department of Vocational Services. In that capacity he was involved in collaborative efforts to establish community / education partnerships and transition activities for youth in Hancock and Washington County schools. Prior to his work in education, Jim was employed as an Atlantic salmon research biologist and later as an aquaculture site manager in down-east and mid-coast Maine.

Jennifer Sepez, Ph.D.

Jennifer Sepez is an anthropologist at NOAA Fisheries' Alaska Fisheries Science Center and an affiliate Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Washington. Previously, she was an editorial assistant at the Journal of Ethnobiology and has worked on traditional ecological knowledge projects with the Makah Tribe in Washington, with Zapotec communities in Mexico, with Aleut and Alutiiq peoples in Alaska. She also spent three seasons cutting fish at an Alaskan fish processor and three years conducting commercial fisheries research for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game.

 

 
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